Follow the dividend investment decisions of a person who has no background in financial investment and wishes to take control of their financial future.

December Dividend Income - 01 Jan 2019 12:29

Tags: monthly_income

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After 31 years of clocking in and out of work and religiously saving 10% annually every year, in good times and bad, I have decided to share my monthly dividend income to show what regular saving and investing can accomplish.

This month I made $2,470 and it was a nice way to wrap up 2018. This is my first month I can do a historical comparison as I just recently started tracking month to month dividend income. Quarter over Quarter my monthly dividend increased $217 or 9.65%. However, this number is slightly inflated as my ETFs make a double distribution payment in December. If we discount the extra ETF income the increase is $86 or 3.83%. Not too shabby and extremely pleased.

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Looking at my 3 year goal metric I improved my percent complete by 0.25% from last month. This was a little less than I had hoped but it was the holidays and I may have spent more than normal. From here on forward over the next 36 months it needs to improve by 0.833% a month. Hopefully things pick up on the income front or I can reduce an annual expense.

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On the expense front I have kept my credit card debt down to zero. With the holidays behind us and all college tuition bills paid my expenses should be fairly stable until July. I did have an unplanned expense as I had to buy a new stove at total cost after taxes and delivery was $556. Two years ago this would have set me back but with my credit card & mortgage debt gone I had the money but it came at the expense of not buying a snow blower I had been saving for.

I realize a snow blower to some is a luxury but two months ago we had an early season snow storm and I had a sore shoulder for three weeks after shoveling. Went to the doctor and discovered I have early onset of arthritis in my right shoulder. It should be fine as long as I limit the stress I put on the shoulder. Luckily, our winter has been mild since that time and we have not had a snow storm since. Looks like I will have to wait until next month to get the snow blower and hopefully mother nature will be accommodating. It is a bit of a gamble as I live in the northeast and the odds are against me.

To wrap things up I’d like to wish everyone a Happy 2019 New Year and hope that all your plans, goals and ambitions for the New Year come true! - Comments: 0

November Dividend Income - 01 Dec 2018 12:32

Tags: monthly_income

clocking_in.png
After 31 years of clocking in and out of work and religiously saving 10% annually every year, in good times and bad, I have decided to share my monthly dividend income to show what regular saving and investing can accomplish.

This Month I made $2,132 and was a bit surprised as I did not expect to break the $2K barrier this month but I forgot about my Fastenal (FAST), Chatham Lodging (CLDT) and Sabra Heath Care (SBRA) purchases which, combined with dividend reinvestment, moved the monthly income across the line. This is my third month of tracking so from here on forward I can start tracking a quarter over quarter growth rate.

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A little over a week ago I created a 3 year goal metric and here is the first monthly update. My percent complete only increased 0.05%. Pretty disappointing but it was only just 9 days ago that I created it and can’t read too much into it. On the positive side, after just a week without contributing any new investment money it did grow on its own so something to take pride in.

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On the expense front I have kept my credit card debt down to zero. But, it is that time of year as I received two college tuition bills in the mail and yes I have two kids in college with a third just 1 ½ years away. The first tuition bill is from my oldest and she will be taking out her very first student loan to pay so the burden is on her and not me. Luckily she graduates in Fall of 2019, with only one more semester she will have $10K in student loan debt. I actually wanted my children to assume some debt to take ownership of their decisions and $10K is pretty manageable.

The second tuition bill I have funds for and it will not impact my monthly expenses. This is something we saved towards 15 years ago so the impacts is minimal. - Comments: 2

October Dividend Income - 02 Nov 2018 21:47

Tags: monthly_income

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After 31 years of clocking in and out of work and religiously saving 10% annually every year, in good times and bad, I have decided to share my monthly dividend income to show what regular saving and investing can accomplish.

This Month I made $2,901 with 88% coming from my IRA and 8% coming from my traditional brokerage account and 4% coming from my Roth.

In 2016 I had the opportunity to rollover my workplace retirement savings and jumped at the chance and is the reason why such a large percentage of the income is from my IRA.

I am still working today and have started to contribute to a new workplace 401K plan and will continue to do so for the next 9 years so this adventure is still continuing…

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September Dividend Income - 28 Sep 2018 23:06

Tags: monthly_income

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After 31 years of clocking in and out of work and religiously saving 10% annually every year, in good times and bad, I have decided to share my monthly dividend income to show what regular saving and investing can accomplish.

This Month I made $2252 with 83% coming from my IRA and 17% coming from my traditional brokerage account.

Most of the income is currently coming from a retirement account as the bulk of my savings were generated through workplace retirement savings that I recently rolled into an IRA and went full throttle income investing. When I first started saving in 1987 there was no mass concept of F.I.R.E. (financial independence retire early). I never had a big salary or did the proverbial “balls to the wall” extreme savings and investing. The only thing I knew was that I wanted to retire at 60 and the initial advice I got was to sock away 10% and retirement would take care of itself so that is what I did and here are the results.

I am still working today and have started to contribute to a new workplace 401K plan and will continue to do so for the next 9 ½ years so this adventure is still continuing and I hope you follow me on my journey to when I retire at 60.

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- Comments: 3


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